Recipes

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I love to cook, and these are the dishes I make for the people around at my table.  Some are simple, some are complex.  My rule of thumb for selecting a recipe is: I only cook a complicated recipe if I’m confident that I can do so without becoming stressed or exhausted by the time my guests arrive.  

Because the most important consideration for choosing a dinner recipe is, “What can I cook with the time, energy, and ingredients I have available – so that by the time the meal is ready I am still able to enjoy the company and conversation of people at my table?”

I’ve learned through trial and error that while most recipes can be easily doubled, many dishes cannot be tripled or quadrupled with a satisfying result.  This is one of the realities of cooking science that I just don’t fully understand.  And so in my recipe posts I include notes about how to modify the servings for a larger group if the ingredients don’t multiply proportionally.

I also suggest easy dinner menus and semi-homemade recipes for people who are short on time, or who don’t necessarily enjoy cooking but still desire to practice genuine hospitality.  Because authentic hospitality isn’t about the food, it’s about the people.  

If your desire is to create a sacred space at your table where people can be truly known – then cooking dinner from scratch, or heating up quality food from a jar, or picking up delicious takeout are all effective means to practicing genuine hospitality.

So I invite you to pick a recipe that matches your hosting style and love someone well with good food and good conversation at your table.

[/fusion_text][/three_fourth][one_fourth last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_widget_area name=”avada-custom-sidebar-pagewidget1″ background_color=”” padding=”” class=”” id=””][/fusion_widget_area][/one_fourth][title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”default” sep_color=”” margin_top=”20px” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””]RECENT POSTS[/title][recent_posts layout=”default” hover_type=”zoomin” columns=”3″ number_posts=”9″ offset=”” cat_slug=”recipes” exclude_cats=”” thumbnail=”yes” title=”yes” meta=”yes” excerpt=”yes” excerpt_length=”35″ strip_html=”yes” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][/recent_posts][/fullwidth]

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